Grace Unveiled, #10: Credited to Your Account | Jim Hammond
 
Recap
 
Pastor Jim preached the 10th installment of his series entitled, “Grace Unveiled,” a study of the book of Romans. This message subtitled, “Credited to Your Account,” finishes up the study of the sin problem and then begins a study of the solution to man’s sin problem—which is Romans 3:21–22, “…faith in Jesus Christ, to all and on all who believe.” Pastor Jim said, “The reason why Paul spent so much time talking about the sin problem is because you can’t understand the solution if you don’t understand the problem.”
 
Dive Deeper
 
Greek scholars and commentators believe the first three chapters of Romans are the most difficult to understand, as these 92 verses give a detailed diagnosis and explanation of sin.
 
It isn’t until Romans 3:21 when Paul actually presents the solution to the sin problem.
 
The reason why Paul spent so much time talking about the sin problem is because you can’t understand the solution if you don’t understand the problem.
 
Paul took the first three chapters of Romans to explain that people without Jesus Christ as their Lord and Savior cannot be righteous in God’s eyes. No matter how many good works you have to your name, you will never—can never—be righteous before God.
 
People have a genetic defect inherent in their flesh—it’s called the sin nature.
 
Here is the problem. How does a holy and just God bridge the gap between our sin nature and His holiness? How does He make it possible for the Holy Spirit to dwell in us?
 
The Old Testament saints did not have that advantage. If the Old Testament saints wanted to speak to God, they had to seek out a prophet.
 
His solution makes us pure enough to have a real relationship with Him and live in heaven with Him. How does He justify us to the point where we can enjoy life with Him?
 
In Romans chapter 4, Paul used both Abraham and David as examples. Abraham was counted righteous not because of his works, but because he believed.
 
David was under the Old Testament law. Abraham was not under the law. He was under the Abrahamic covenant. You could say Abraham was the first Hebrew ever. Abraham was the founder of the Hebrew race.
 
Romans 4:1, “[But] if so, what shall we say about Abraham, our forefather humanly speaking—[what did he] find out? [How does this affect his position, and what was gained by him?] 2 For if Abraham was justified (established as just by acquittal from guilt) by good works [that he did, then] he has grounds for boasting. But not before God!”
 
What does the scripture say? “Abraham believed in, trusted in God, and it was credited to his account as righteousness.” It tells us what was credited to his account. And what’s the account? As if you’ve lived right and are in right standing. He’s credited with that. Because he believed! Not because he lived right.
 
Verse 4–5 says, “Now to a laborer, his wages are not counted as a favor or a gift, but as an obligation (something owed to him). But to one who, not working [by the Law], trusts (believes fully) in Him Who justifies the ungodly, his faith is credited to him as righteousness (the standing acceptable to God).”
Who does He justify? The godly? No! The ungodly! His faith is credited to him as righteousness. That’s New Testament righteousness. That didn’t happen in the Old Testament except with Abraham.
 
Paul is trying to get us to understand what this gift of New Testament righteousness brings for us.
 
Remember, the first three chapters tells us that no man was morally right with God. Not the pagans… not the practicing Jew… and not the regular good guy. They can do nothing to make themselves righteous before God.
 
Then he points to the solution in Romans 3:21, “But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets, even the righteousness of God, through faith in Jesus Christ, to all and on all who believe.”
 
Read About It
 
Rom. 4:1–5 “[But] if so, what shall we say about Abraham, our forefather humanly speaking—[what did he] find out? [How does this affect his position, and what was gained by him?] 2 For if Abraham was justified (established as just by acquittal from guilt) by good works [that he did, then] he has grounds for boasting. But not before God! 3 For what does the Scripture say? Abraham believed in (trusted in) God, and it was credited to his account as righteousness (right living and right standing with God). 4 Now to a laborer, his wages are not counted as a favor or a gift, but as an obligation (something owed to him). 5 But to one who, not working [by the Law], trusts (believes fully) in Him Who justifies the ungodly, his faith is credited to him as righteousness (the standing acceptable to God).”
 
Rom. 3:21, “But now the righteousness of God has been revealed independently and altogether apart from the Law, although actually it is attested by the Law and the Prophets, 22 Namely, the righteousness of God which comes by believing with personal trust and confident reliance on Jesus Christ (the Messiah).”
 
Discussion Questions
 
What was it about Abraham that God said made him righteous?
In your own words, describe what the “sin problem” is.
What is the solution to man’s sin problem?

Recent Sermon Notes

Grace Unveiled: For the Promise to Be Sure  #12 | Jim Hammond

Pastor Jim gave his 12th installment on his series entitled, “Grace Unveiled.” The Old Testament law always produced the wrath of God as a consequence for disobedience. No one outside of Jesus Christ had the ability to keep Old Testament law! Yet there are many Christians that try to live their lives according to Old Testament law. And they are failing. Pastor Jim went on to explain why in his message subtitled, “For the Promise to Be Sure.”

Grace Unveiled: To Whom the Lord Will Not Impute Sin  #11 | Jim Hammond

Pastor Jim continued his series on Romans entitled, “Grace Unveiled.” This 11th installment of the series entitled, “To Whom the Lord Will Not Impute sin” picks up at Romans 4:6: “Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works.” Pastor Jim carefully unfolded what it means for God to not impute your sin. Essentially, this scripture is saying, “Blessed is he who stepped over that line and the burden of what he should get for crossing that boundary is taken off of him.” That guy is blessed!

Light Be | Russ Kalenberg

This past Memorial Day weekend, the Living Word congregation was blessed to hear special guest minister Russ Kalenberg preach his message entitled, “Light Be.” In the beginning, Genesis says the world was a chaotic mess, a scene of disorder and confusion. Does that sound familiar? The world today is very much a chaotic mess, a scene of disorder and confusion. What is the answer? It’s the same as it was in the beginning! “Light be!”

At Wit’s End | Jim Hammond

Have you ever been “at your wit’s end?” When you’ve exhausted all your emotional and physical resources and have nothing left to give, what do you do? When the Apostle Paul was at his wit’s end, the Lord gave him direction saying, “My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness.” Pastor Jim went on to expound on when we are at our wit’s end, how we can lean on His grace.

Grace Unveiled, #9: Established in the Gift of Righteousness | Jim Hammond

This past weekend, Pastor Jim taught his 9th installment in his series on the book of Romans entitled, “Grace Unveiled.” The first three and a half chapters of Romans, Paul talked extensively, driving home the point, on how no one can make himself righteous in God’s eyes. The Apostle Paul didn’t leave anyone out. He listed the Pagans in the secular world, people just trying to do good, and the zealous disciplined Jews… he made sure they knew that none of them measured up in God’s eyes. No matter what they did, they would never be able to escape God’s wrath… unless there is something that appeases that judgment. That was Paul’s way of working up to a point. Paul then introduced the righteousness of God through Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection.